The Ghost Writer

The Ghost Writer

—4.5—

Philip Roth’s famous Nathan Zuckerman series begins with The Ghost Writer.  It introduces us to Zuckerman in his early twenties, after minor success with a few short stories, hoping to become a major force in literature.  A story about his family has put him at odds with them, and so he goes to discuss his work with a recluse writer he is enraptured with.  The night becomes quite a fiasco, in that emotions run high, and Zuckerman falls in love with a woman who may be a famous historical (and supposedly dead) writer.  This book is severly uncomfortable at times, and I have to admit that a great deal was probably over my head.  But I really enjoyed it.  It was a discussion of literature as art, and what makes it such, and the types of people who write great things but live the mundane.  It is not a book with an expansive plot, but more a character study of several very different, and difficult, people.  I am very excited to read the next Zuckerman novel, and see where life takes him.

4.5/5

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This entry was posted in Book Reviews, Classic Literature, General Fiction and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Ghost Writer

  1. Charley says:

    Hmm, this sounds interesting. I just read Portnoy’s Complaint, and I can’t say it made me a particular fan of Roth’s, but he certainly is a unique writer, and I wouldn’t mind reading him again in the future.

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